Does Money Lead to Happiness? | The Science of Empathy
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Does Money Lead to Happiness? | The Science of Empathy


82 thoughts on “Does Money Lead to Happiness? | The Science of Empathy

  1. Could their increase in happiness (on camera) be connected to the fact that they are being recorded and they wanted to look good on camera?

  2. I’m watching this while in line at Starbucks drive-thru, It’s inspired me to pay for the person’s coffee behind me. Never done this before! Lol, hope it’s not a huge order! Love SoulPancake!

  3. So, here's $50, you can donate or keep, we won't know. 5 seconds later – did you donate or keep? Get tricked lol

  4. This video made me pay for the person behind me at the McDonald's drive thru 😀 … That MOTHERFUCKER SPENT 40$ ON DAMN CHICKEN NUGGETS

  5. It's possible they didn't feel as good when keeping the money because they were guilted by the camera and the social pressure they felt around the situation. While I like soul pancake, I'm not a fan of how unscientific these studies are. I feel like it really detracts from the final message they are trying to show.

  6. Keep the money, half the money goes yo the people who run the charity anyways. Volunteer for charity instead, it's priceless and full of experience. Your time is worth more than 50 bucks

  7. People who know they are being watched act differently than they would otherwise. So it's not really "scientific" at all… but I get the point.

  8. I like the message that is being portrayed here but it's not fully accurate. While being empathetic increases happiness, economic status is also linked with a person's level of happiness too, but wasn't controlled for. I sympathize with the people who kept the money because I probably would have in this moment, I'm flat broke right now and have bills to pay. I could use that money badly, and it's hard to justify giving if I can't even give to myself

  9. You need to get people who are in the same financial situation. Also people donated because it was just $50. Had it been more money (like around $500 or more) I don't think many people would donate.

  10. The issue here is that this video is not nuanced in regarding situations. One of the women pointed out she kept it to help save up for her daughters braces. Does that mean she is less happy?

    When you donate to something it is for a cause to help others, but in some cases, you or your family may be the one who needs help.

  11. Could you do another experiment?:
    This time ask your partakers to bring a 50$ bill. Upon the begnining of the experiment let them hand you the 50$ and thn continue as you did in this video. It would be very interesting to see the outcome here.

  12. About a year ago I would have donated the money, but after learning more from friends in the social work field I see that giving of my time is more important; so I would keep the money then go volunteer.

  13. Woah, $64 is a lot of money. I probably would have donated it because I would for definitely feel happier giving money to people who need it more than I do.

  14. Not part of the experiment but I played this game to see how accurate my 'first impression'/'ability to read people' is. So before hearing whether they decided to donate or keep I would guess who kept and who donated.
    It was entertaining. Highly recommend 😀

  15. What I hate is how, at work, they tend to shame you if you don't donate. They bring the Red Cross or Salvation Army or whatever sheets around anually and pressure you to donate. If you say you don't want to then they ask why or try to say you should reconsider or not be selfish. Now granted, this could just be my personal experience with the places I work but I hate when people who are passionate about something try to urge you to donate by guilt-tripping you. They have no idea what I am dealing with at home or how much I donate. I give my time and money to many things. I help friends and family all the time and often times go without things I want to make sure my family and friends have things they need. I work hard and get paid less than I should for it so when they try to guilt me into paying "even just one dollar" or something, it really irks me.

    You can be passionate about something and explain why someone might want to consider donating or helping but guilting someone into something like saying "just one dollar" is an unfair tactic because that person might only have a few bucks in their pocket till the next pay period and that "one dollar" could have been the difference between them being able to afford a decent meal that day or having to put an item back at the checkout counter that day. Looking out for yourself and/or your family should not come second to strangers. Yes, it is good to help others less fortunate but if your well-being suffers for it then maybe it wasn't the best decision.

  16. I'm not a scientist, but I'm wondering how this experiment would have went if you guys had a group of people of the same social status, without huge loans of any sort do this experiment. I would be more curious to see the result of that.

  17. Thank you so much for sharing this! We agree, empathy is a muscle that must be exercised. We can do that via the habits we create for ourselves and our family. (Kindly visit our nonprofit organization for tips on how to raise kids who are kind and caring: DoingGoodTogether.org)

  18. I wonder if a lot of the happiness was effected by the cameras. I assume if they weren’t being filmed their happiness wouldn’t be the same.

  19. Money makes life easier and therefore indirectly could make people happier yes, but does it independently make people more happy? No…..thus why so many celebrities still struggle with depression, suicide, etc……

  20. For the people in the comments referring to the cameras putting pressure on them, try checking out the more in depth study in the description he referenced in the beginning of the video. Sometimes the camera does cheapen studies like this which is why I like when channels like this site their sources of inspiration.

  21. More people donated here because of pressure to (simply by being given the option. If they’d just been given $50, far fewer would have donated it), but also because they didn’t feel the money was theirs. They hadn’t earned it, to they don’t have as strong an attachment.

  22. This is incredibly bias. You are basically guilting them in to donating it. That being said if they really need $50 that badly in their life they need to rethink their current life choices. $50 should not be this big of a choice in your life. It should just be a "meh yeah I'll donate it, why not?"

    Did you pick those people off the craigslist work wanted add or what?

  23. I would easily choose to keep it. I'll donate on my own time, privately. It's the pressure of the situation that I don't like. I don't want to feel pressured to do the "right thing", I want to do that on my own.

  24. I went to the mall with 50$ i saved up to buy my bro a present but on my way out there was some people holding a charity. I gave them the 50$. Didn’t really increase me.

  25. The women who kept the money wasnt helping herself she donated the money to her children she is the needy and poor in this situation.

  26. How would they know who decided to keep it in order to give it back if it's anonymous and they didn't disclose their decision at the end? I missed that tid bit…

  27. It wasn't my money to begin with, I didn't work for it. I always wish I had extra money to donate. So if it's just an amount that isn't going to change my life (even if it was, I would donate a portion) I would donate it to an animal rescue. My problem would be which one… Probably Animal Aid Unlimited. They do so much with such little resources…they save some very lost broken souls.

  28. Pfff Americans they think they are perfect they are stupid hippies always so happy with their fake bullshit but they are just a bunch of idiots 😂🤣

  29. Cool so people who dont really need 50$ felt good about giving it away and people who felt they really needed 50$ felt kind of guilty.
    Idk this feels more like poor shaming.

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