SpaceLab Biological Entry: The Reishi Mushroom
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SpaceLab Biological Entry: The Reishi Mushroom


-Good day. I’m Thomas, and I’m 15.
-I’m Ruby, and I’m 15. And I’m Francesca, and I’m 15. And this is our SpaceLab entry. During space flights of long duration,
microgravity takes its toll on human body. Space flights of such nature
can cause adverse health effects… …such as muscle wastage,
chronic fatigue… …insomnia caused
by environmental stress, and neurosis. In Asia and American countries grows a
special mushroom known as the Reishi Mushroom. The chemical composition
of the Ganodermic acid… …contained in this Mushroom is
similar to that of steroid hormones. That may possibly positively influence
muscular toning of astronauts… …in microgravity or Zero-G environments
on future long-duration missions. And so knowing the manner in which the
fungi grows in such environments… …could prove essential in solving
the problems faced on these trips. It can also provide a solution
on long journeys… …where it could be impractical
to bring things aboard due to weight constraints… …as a source of medication. In the 1g environment on Earth,
the positioning of the hymenium… …or fruiting body of the Reishi
is said to be negatively geotropic… …meaning hymenium will face opposite
to the origin of the gravity or right side up. We therefore pose the question… …how does microgravity affect
the positioning of the hymenia… …or fruiting body in the Ganoderma
Lucidium fungi or the Reishi? To give us the answer to this question,
we will be testing the hypothesis: When in a microgravity environment,
the Ganoderma Lucidium hymenia… …will position itself
in no predictable orientation… …with the state of the stem growing
in unsystematic fashion… …compared to that of the
Fungi on Earth… To test this, we intend to grow
multiple spores on fixed pieces… …in the same orientation of decaying
Eastern Hemlock Wood… …or Tsuga Canadensis… …which is a natural growth medium of this
specific fungi in a humid environment. To determine if the growth pattern of this
fungus are unsystematic in microgravity… …still pictures can be sequentially
captured… …to observe the development patterns
of the fungus. We came to the conclusion Habitat One,
or the butterfly habitat… …will be the most suitable for the
experiment… …due to the necessity of humidity
and environmental control and monitoring. We predict that the fungi will in fact grow
in unsystematic manner… …with no predictable orientation
due to the absence of gravity.

9 thoughts on “SpaceLab Biological Entry: The Reishi Mushroom

  1. Speak too fast.. – and with that echo in the room… very difficult to understand what you say you guys….Β 

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