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CHEMISTRY 101 – Root mean square velocity of gas molecules

According to kinetic molecular theory, the average kinetic energy of a gas is directly proportional to the temperature in Kelvin. If we have a mixture of gases with different molar masses at a given temperature, for the average kinetic energy of each gas to be the same, lighter gas particles will travel faster on average. […]

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Molecular Geometry and Polarity: Trigonal Planar (polar)

Drawing a Lewis diagram will help determine the electron pair geometry and molecular shape of CH2O. Refer to the periodic table of elements to find the number of valence electrons in each atom. This molecule has a total of 12 valence electrons: four electrons from carbon, one electron from each hydrogen atom, and six electrons […]

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Bioclipse:”Open Source” Tutorial: Free software for molecular scientists, 3D chemical modeling

Bioclipse: Free software for molecular scientists. Bioclipse is open source software that integrates separate programs into a single interface that lets you: edit two dimensional structures manipulate three dimensional models and predict molecular behavior Initially, the workbench is empty. After installing “sample data”, the “left navigator panel” will have files. Bioclipse can edit two dimensional […]

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Is It Easier to Recognize People Who Look Like You?

Faces are possibly the most important visual stimuli that we perceive. The moment you see a person’s face, you can infer their race, age, mood, identity, and possibly their gender expression (always ask). Unless, of course, you have prosopagnosia, aka ‘face blindness’ — where you can’t tell familiar or unfamiliar faces apart. Prosopagnosia is important […]

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CHEMISTRY 101 – Basics of Lewis Structures for Molecular Compounds

In covalent bonding atoms share electrons to satisfy the octet rule or the duet rule for hydrogen. We can use this pattern to predict the Lewis structure for a compound formed between two elements (for example, hydrogen and oxygen). Hydrogen follows the duet rule so it wants one additional electron, whereas oxygen wants two additional […]

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