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The psychology of post-traumatic stress disorder – Joelle Rabow Maletis

Many of us will experience some kind of trauma during our lifetime. Sometimes, we escape with no long-term effects. But for millions of us, those experiences linger, causing symptoms like flashbacks, nightmares, and negative thoughts that interfere with everyday life. This phenomenon, called post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, isn’t a personal failing; rather, it’s a […]

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“I Am Working To Understand Molecular Pathways…” Says Andrea

“So, we’re in a lab research building at the Medical School at Yale University. It’s called the Boyer Center for Molecular Medicine. We had three graduate students initially that all started at the same time, and we have currently three Postdocs, so they all ready have their PhDs and are continuing on to do research. […]

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Is It Easier to Recognize People Who Look Like You?

Faces are possibly the most important visual stimuli that we perceive. The moment you see a person’s face, you can infer their race, age, mood, identity, and possibly their gender expression (always ask). Unless, of course, you have prosopagnosia, aka ‘face blindness’ — where you can’t tell familiar or unfamiliar faces apart. Prosopagnosia is important […]

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The Molecule of More: Dopamine with Daniel Z. Lieberman, MD, and Michael E. Long (SOP76)

Kaitlin Luna: Welcome to Speaking of Psychology, a biweekly podcast from the American Psychological Association. I’m your host, Kaitlin Luna. The topic for this episode is dopamine. It’s known as the chemical of love, sex, creativity and addiction. Dopamine always wants more. It pushes us to achieve greatness but can also lead to our downfall. […]

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2-Minute Neuroscience: Alzheimer’s Disease

Welcome to 2 minute neuroscience, where I simplistically explain neuroscience topics in 2 minutes or less. In this installment I will discuss Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease, meaning it is characterized by the degeneration and death of neurons. It is classified as a type of dementia, a term […]

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Autism — what we know (and what we don’t know yet) | Wendy Chung

“Why?” “Why?” is a question that parents ask me all the time. “Why did my child develop autism?” As a pediatrician, as a geneticist, as a researcher, we try and address that question. But autism is not a single condition. It’s actually a spectrum of disorders, a spectrum that ranges, for instance, from Justin, a […]

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